Laval's Ancestors+
You are currently anonymous Log In
 

Notes


Tree:  

Matches 151 to 200 of 400

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
151 Info/Bio of Pierre Thibodeau:

Today THIBODEAUX is among the more common surnames of French origin in L ouisiana. The name is not uncommon in French Canada, where it occurs es pecially in and around Montreal and in the Maritime Provinces; it is al so frequent in New England, chiefly in Maine and New Hampshire, reflect ing immigration from French Canada. In both Louisiana and Canada the na me may stem principally from Thibodeaux families who settled in Acadia i n the seventeenth century.

Pierre Thibodeaux was born in 1631 in Poitou (Poirou), France. He was t he son of Mathurin "Rhibauda" and Marie Debeau. He came to Port Royal, A cadia, in 1654 where he married in 1660 Jeanne Terriot, daughter of Jea n Terriot and Perrine Bourg (Reau). The census of 1671 shows Pierre and J eanne had six sons

* Pierre,
* Jean,
* Antoine,
* Pierre, Michel, and
* Claude
* and eight daughters.

Pierre was the founder of Chipody, Acadia, known today as Shipody, New B runswick. He died at Port Royal on December 26, 1704. Marie Thibodeaux, d aughter of Pierre and Marie, was born at Port Royal in 1661. She marrie d Antoine Landry in 1681 at Grand Pre', Acadia.
 
Thibodeau, Pierre (I33023)
 
152 Sources

Source: S199 Abbreviation: Ancestry Family Trees Title: Ancestry Family Trees (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.) Subsequent Source Citation Format: Ancestry Family Trees BIBL Ancestry Family Trees. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. TMPLT TID 0 FIELD Name: Footnote VALUE Ancestry Family Trees (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.) FIELD Name: ShortFootnote VALUE Ancestry Family Trees FIELD Name: Bibliography VALUE Ancestry Family Trees. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Repository: #R1 Page: Ancestry Family Trees TMPLT FIELD Name: Page VALUE Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13245745&pid=472

Repository: R1 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Address 1: http://www.Ancestry.com  
Cassâe - Lacasse, Marguerite (I132)
 
153 Thibodeau's help to settle Acadia



Chipoudy was founded by poitevin Pierre Thibaudeau. He founded the village in 1698, with his four sons and a friend. After that, his friend, Guillaume Blanchard and his two sons, founded and established themselves in Petitcodiac. Deportation In August of 1755, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Monckton sent Captain Sylvanus Cobb to deport the population of Chipoudy. The English soldiers were sent to Beaubassin, Petitcodiac, Chipoudy, and Memramcook to take the Acadiens prisoners. However, through guidance by the local missionary, Father LeGuerne, the Acadians hide in the woods. Then, on August 26th, Lieutenant Boishébert of Miramichi and 125 soldiers and a group of Micmacs, surprised 200 Englishmen, under the command of Major Frye. The English had set fire to the church of Chipoudy and 181 homes, as well as 250 houses in Petitcodiac. Boishébert gave the order to attack at the moment that the English were setting fire to the church of Petitcodiac. After three hours of fierce fighting, the English retreated, leaving behind 50 dead, and around 60 wounded. It was thus that 200 families were able to escape the  
Thibodeau, Pierre (I33023)
 
154 WED 5O YEARS - Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Routhier celebrated their golden wedding anniversary recently at a party at the Marcotte Nursing Home where Mrs. Routhier is a patient. A special cake, decorated in white with golden leaves was served with wine and the couple received flowers, gifts and many cards. Mrs. Routhier was presented an orchid corsage and Mr. Routhier, a carnation boutonniere.

Mr. Routhier and thee former Aldea Viens were married Nov. 5, 1924, at St. Malo, Que. and have resided in this commumty for 33 years. Their resIdence is 25 Fair St., Lewiston, and Mr. Routhier is a retired carpenter. They have four daughters, Georgette Smith, Hawaii; Annette Burns. Milpitas, Calif.; Pierrette Fosnot, McLean, Va., and Renette Larock, Auburn. Mrs. Fosnot and Mrs. Larock were present for the happy occasion and Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Burns joined in the festivities by telephone. There are also six grandchIldren.

All the patients on D-4 at the Home were party guests and Rev. J.J. Dorion officiated at a special Mass in their honor.



from the Lewiston Evening Journal - Nov 8, 1974 
VIENS, Aldea (P53)
 
155 !RESEARCH: LDS Ancestral File AFN: GRK2-L6 has Isabelle or Elizabeth as given names. Adrien Bergeron: Le Grand Arrangement des Acadiens au Quebec, page 252 shows that Elizabeth married Alexandre Richard and Isabelle married Olivier Boutot in 1686 at Port Royal. Same source Vol 8, p 100 shows that Michel Thibaudeau married Marie Richard on 18 Sep 1729 at Grand Pre, the daughter of Alexandre Richard and Isabelle Petitpas. Petipas, Isabelle Or Elizabeth (I2374)
 
156 "Dit" in French means "say" and in this context, it means "called Expired." In other words, a person might be Pierre Bourbeau said Lacourse, Which Means That He Had an ancestor named Bourbeau, purpose he chooses to use the name Lacourse INSTEAD. So he is Pierre Bourbeau called Expired Lacourse. He'bert, M. Francoise (I2197)
 
157 "Uncle Charlie" focus of all the boat and lost anchor stories Denmerer, Charles (P130)
 
158 #357 seventh January 1870 Gortconny - Ramoan
John McDonald - male -married-61 years - Pensioner from91st Regt - Heart Disease a year- Anasaren 5 weeks certified
Witness: Mary Ann McDonald - Present at death
Address: Gortconny
Recorded: Twelfth January 1870-
GM Connor-Registrar 
Source Source: S-2127067805 (S-2127067805)
 
159 (Vivien, maréchal-ferrant, et f Suzanne HÉRAULT), b 18-10-1651 St-Vivien, v. Écoyeux, ar. La Rochelle; s 06-08-1703 Québec; engagé en 1669 de Pierre GAIGNEUR; arrivé Québec fin juin 1669 avec sa fiancée et ses deux frères Élie m avec Marie GAGNÉ et Pierre m avec Françoise FAVREAU; embarqué dans le Pot de beurre, de Horn; 27 ans m annulé ct 13-03-1669 Rabusson (La Rochelle) avec Anne TROLLEAU; en 1669 laboureur à Tasdon, par. d?Aytré, ar. La Rochelle; en 1671 laboureur du faubourg de Tasdon, par. St-Nicolas de La Rochelle; à Champlain au rec. 81, 30 ans; 45 ans en 1703; m 29-11-1671 Québec (m à Beauport) cts 02, 19 Becquet et 03 Vachon) avec Catherine GATEAU; famille établie à Charlesbourg; 9 enfants. (DGFQ : 594, 595; Les quatre frères Jean : 88-89, 139)  Ayrault-Herault, Suzanne (I2365)
 
160 09 Feb 1891 8160  Source Source: S-2122601067 (S-2122601067)
 
161 1.26.22
Ancestry Update

DNA research laval a. thibodeau. previously it was thought that upwards of 47% was Nordic some 10 yrs. later we find, some 1400 data points, that 98% is from mostly France as nearby countries.

France
Primarily located in: France
Also found in: Luxembourg, Spain, Switzerland
Our France region is known for both the splendor of Paris and its picturesque countryside of plains and rolling hills checkered with fields and hedgerows. Evidence of human life in France, including the stunning galleries of Stone Age paintings in Lascaux Cave, stretches back long before recorded history. Today?s French are mostly urban dwellers and can trace their roots to several key groups who made their way into l?Hexagone starting about 2,500 years ago.

Life in the Stone Age

Evidence of human life in France, including the stunning galleries of Stone Age paintings in Lascaux Cave, stretches back long before recorded history. But the French can trace their roots to several key groups who made their way into l?Hexagone starting about 25 centuries ago.

La Gaule

From their homeland in what we now call Austria, Celtic tribes had spread across most of western Europe, including the region we now call France, by 450 B.C. Romans called the area Gaul. Gaul?s Celtic inhabitants were farmers, skilled metalworkers, and traders who belonged to tribes ruled by a council of elders with a king or an elected ruler and a priestly class known as druids. Many lived in large, fortified villages the Romans called oppidum.

These inhabitants were formidable warriors, whom the Romans and other military powers often hired as mercenaries?when they weren?t busy fighting them themselves.

Caesar Crushes the Celts

Between 58 and 50 B.C., the Romans invaded Gaul, where conflict with the Celtic tribes was a chronic problem. The Celtic chieftain Vercingetorix led a union of tribes against the invading Romans but was defeated at the Battle of Alesia in 52 B.C. by Julius Caesar. Rome annexed Gaul into the Republic, and the Gauls mingled with the Romans to form a Gallo-Roman culture that adopted and adapted the language, customs, government, and religion of the empire. Many generals, and even emperors, were born in Gaul or came from Gallic families. The Romans? ?vulgar Latin? (common speech) became the basis for French.

Franks in France

The Franks conquered northern Gaul in 486 A.D. Over the course of almost four centuries, a string of Frankish kings, from Clovis to Charlemagne, expanded Frankish control over much of Western Europe, including almost all of France and most of today's Germany, Austria, and northern Italy.

In 843 the Treaty of Verdun divided Charlemagne's empire among three of his grandsons. Charles the Bald got the western portion, Western Francia, which, along with parts of the middle kingdom, would become France.

Roman influence had already led to the development of Old French. Clovis?s conversion to Christianity and Charlemagne?s being crowned ?Emperor of the Romans? by Pope Leo III cemented the central place of the Catholic Church in French history and culture for more than a millennium.

French Heard ?round the World

France played a direct role in English history with the Norman invasion of 1066. Efforts to establish a colonial empire took French language, French culture, and the Catholic Church to North America, the West Indies and French Guiana, Africa, India, and Asia. 
THIBODEAU, Laval (P2)
 
162 18. JOSEPH OCTAVE6 MASSON (AIME5, JOSEPH4, BARNABE AMABLE3, JEAN2, FRANCOIS1) was born Abt. 1840, and died June 28, 1895 in St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada. He married LISA DION June 28, 1875 in St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada, daughter of ELOIE DION and MARGUERITE MORIN. She died Unknown.

More About JOSEPH OCTAVE MASSON:
Burial: June 28, 1895, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada

More About LISA DION:
Other-Begin: AKA Liza

More About JOSEPH MASSON and LISA DION:
Marriage: June 28, 1875, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada

Children of JOSEPH MASSON and LISA DION are:
28.
i.CLARINNA CORINNA7 MASSON, b. November 16, 1855, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. Unknown.

ii.JOSEPH ALDRIC MASSON, b. July 10, 1876, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. 1955, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada.

29.iii. MATHILDE MASSON, b. August 31, 1879, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. Unknown.

30.iv.MAXIMILIEN EMILIEN MASSON, b. March 17, 1882, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. 1956.

31.v. MARIE ALPHONSINE ALBINA MASSON, b. February 21, 1884, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. Unknown.

vi.DESIRE JOSEPH MASSON, b. March 26, 1888, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. September 15, 1891, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada.

vii.HEDWIDGE LAURA MASSON, b. March 09, 1890, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. September 07, 1891, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada.

viii.NAPOLEAN MASSON, b. March 09, 1890, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada; d. September 07, 1891, St. Edwidge, PQ, Canada.

ix.ELIZABETH EVA MASSON, b. 1892; d. Unknown.

Link can be found at:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/p/Raymond-Stpeter-MA/GENE2-0006.html 
(Masson) VIENS, Clarina (P32)
 
163 1881 Census:

Joseph VIEN M Male French 27 Q Farmer Catholic

Joseph VIEN Male French 3 Q Catholic

Fred VIEN Male French 1 Q Catholic


-----------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place Clifton East and West, Compton, Quebec
Family History Library Film 1375835
NA Film Number C-13199
District 54
Sub-district Q
Division 2
Page Number 1
Household Number 4 
FONTAINE, Marie Lea (P52)
 
164 1881 Census:
Joseph VIEN M Male French 27 Q Farmer Cathol
Joseph VIEN Male French 3 Q Catholic
Fred VIEN Male French 1 Q Catholic


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place Clifton East and West, Compton, Quebec
Family History Library Film 1375835
NA Film Number C-13199
District 54
Sub-district Q
Division 2
Page Number 1
Household Number 4 
VIENS, Joseph (P10)
 
165 Agent immobilier Raboin, Marcel (I814)
 
166 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F922
 
167 Agnès Dugas's children and some demographics

Female, #36209, (about 1686 - ) Agnès Dugas was born about 1686 in Port-Royal, Acadia, Canada.1,2 She was the daughter of Claude Dugas and Françoise Bourgeois.1,2 On 13 November 1704 Agnès, married Michel Thibodeau, son of Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Thériot, in Port-Royal, Acadia, Canada.1,2
Children of Agnès Dugas and Michel Thibodeau

Marguerite Thibodeau1 (22 Dec 1705 - 4 Sep 1765)

Agnès Thibodeau1 (19 Nov 1706 - )

Michel Thibodeau1 (2 May 1708 - 10 Jun 1770)

Pierre Thibodeau1 (4 Jan 1710 - )

Joseph Thibodeau1 (16 Feb 1711 - 21 Dec 1757)

Charles Thibodeau1 (27 May 1713 - b 5 Aug 1765)

Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau1 (16 Oct 1714 - )

Marie-Josèphe Thibodeau1 (24 Apr 1716 - )
Élisabeth Thibodeau1 (3 Jun 1718 - )

François Thibodeau1 (11 Feb 1720 - )

Benjamin Thibodeau1 (20 Sep 1721 - )

Jean-Baptiste Thibodeau1 (5 Oct 1723 - b 1763)

Amand-Grégoire Thibodeau1 (16 Dec 1724 - 7 Apr 1740)

Claire Thibodeau1 (29 Mar 1726 - bt 3 May 1762 - 8 Oct 1762)

Anne Thibodeau1 (5 Jul 1728 - 3 Jan 1759)

Citations
White, Stephen A. Dictionnaire Généalogique des Famillies Acadiennes. volume II. Monction, Canada: Centre d'Études Acadiennes, Université de Moncton, 1999).
White, Stephen A. Dictionnaire Généalogique des Famillies Acadiennes. volume I. Monction, Canada: Centre d'Études Acadiennes, Université de Moncton, 1999). 
Dugas, Agnes (I2177)
 
168 Agriculteur Rabouin, Joseph (I770)
 
169 All Chouinards living in Canada and the United States are descendants of Jacques Chouinard who was born on January 6, 1663 in Beaumont-la-Ronce, province of Touraine, France ( This village is located about 20 miles to the north of Tours). He was the son of Charles Chouinard, a merchant of serge, and of Élisabeth Valin. Charles Chouinard was born on September 26, 1616 in Nouzilly, a village located about 5 miles from Beaumont-la-Ronce.

The exact date of arrival of Jacques Chouinard in the New World has not yet been determined. The year 1685 has been chosen because at that time, his name disappeared from the church registers of Beaumont-la-Ronce. The first known sign of his presence in New France is his marriage contract signed before notary Louis Chambalon in Québec on May 30, 1692. His bride, Louise Jean, was the daughter of Pierre Jean and Françoise Favreau. Pierre Jean owned a farm of 7 arpents at la Canardière; he gave 3 arpents to his new son-in-law. A few years later, the Chouinards left la Canardière to rejoin the Jean family at l?Île-aux-Oies. On October 27, 1698, Charles Aubert de la Chesnaye granted to Jacques Chouinard, a concession of 9 arpents of frontage on the St. Lawrence river in the Port-Joly seigneury. The Chouinard family settled on this piece of land to raise their family and spend the rest of their lives.

Jacques Chouinard and Louise Jean had sixteen children, ten of them survived : six sons and four daughters. The first child, Pierre the elder, was born at la Canardière. The next five, Jacques, Joseph, Eustache, Pierre the younger and Louise, were born at l?Île-aux-Oies. The other children were all born at the Port-Joly farm : Jean-Baptiste, Marguerite, Marie-Anne, Marie-Ursule, François, Élisabeth, Jacques, Julien, an unnamed stillborn child, and the last one, Charles.

The place and date of Jacques Chouinard?s death are still unknown. Various sources seem to indicate that he died during the fall of 1721. He was leaving a widow with ten dependant children. His wife, Louise Jean, lived on for 29 years, she died on January 1, 1750.

Five sons of the Chouinard-Jean couple are at the origin of the Chouinard family five branches: Pierre the elder, Eustache, Pierre the younger, François and Julien. Pierre the elder married Ursule Martin at Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière on February 14, 1724. Eustache married Madeleine Bérubé on July 8, 1725. Pierre the younger married Geneviève Lizot on November 18, 1727 à Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière; after the death of his first wife, he married Marie-Anne Pelletier at Saint-roch-des-Aulnaies on November 4, 1743. François was merried to Marguerite Huret-Rochefort but the place and date of their marriage were never found. Julien married Reine Fortin at l?Islet on January 16, 1741. The last son, Charles, was married and had three daughters; he had no descent bearing the Chouinard name.

E-Link may be found at:

http://www.familleschouinard.com/eancetre.html 
Chouinard, Jacques (I2417)
 
170 Apparently no children came out of this union. Alfred died some 2 yrs. following this marriage. on 04.1.1869.

- Marie-Delvina Laverdiere will later get married to Marc Asselin 
Family F808
 
171 Aunis is a historical province of France, situated in the north-west of the department of Charente-Maritime. Its historic capital is La Rochelle, which took over from Castrum Allionis (Châtelaillon) the historic capital which gives its name to the province.

It was a fief of the Duchy of Aquitaine. It extended to Marais Poitevin in the north, Basse Saintonge (and Niortais) in the east, and Rochefortais in the south. Aunis had an influence approximately 20?25 km into the Isle of Ré (l'Île de Ré).

The province was officially recognised during the reign of Charles V of France in 1374: "In 1374, Charles V separated La Rochelle from Saintonge to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon. It was thus that Aunis legally became a separate province."[1]

Aunis was the smallest province in France, in terms of area. Nowadays it is a part of the Charente-Maritime département together with Saintonge.

People from Aunis were called Aunisien (masculine) or Aunisienne (feminine). The English term is Aunisian. 
Dit Godon (Vivien), Pierre Jean (I2414)
 
172 Bachelors, Spinsters, Anonymous, Children According Register or Census

Marie-Louise Masson 11 Jun 1750 St-François-de-Sales, Neuville Agnes Grenier

Charlotte Masson 17 Feb 1755 St-François-de-Sales, Neuville Agnes Grenier

Marie-Louise Masson 04 Apr 1774 Rivière-du-Loup (Louiseville) Marie-Anne Landry

Marguerite Masson 24 Apr 1776 St-Antoine-de-la-Rivière-du-Loup (Louiseville), Maskinongé, Québec Marie-Anne Landry 
MASSON, Barnabe (P327)
 
173 Baptized as

laval andre' joseph thibodeau to

Alberic Thibodeau (father)

Aurore Viens (mother)

born in West Stewartstown Hospital on 9.10.1950

Baptized by Rev. Charles W Trundel

God Father
Maurice Perron

God Mother
Lisette Thibodeau (Crawford)

Baptismal Register of aforementioned church on 5.18.1950 by Rev. Leo Nadeau 
THIBODEAU, Laval (P2)
 
174 Birthplace of Jean Vivien:

Cette maison est régulièrement visitée par des descendants de la famille Jean. Même si, fort probablement, aucun élement d'architecture ne date du 17e siècle, la maison est considérée comme la maison des ancêtres Jean.

E-Link-with picture of birthplace may be found at:

http://inventairenf.cieq.ulaval.ca:8080/inventaire/oneLieu.do?refLieu=354&returnForward=%2FonePersonnage.do%3FrefPersonnage%3D1040

Adresse: Bouleaux, rue des
Ecoyeux / Charente-Maritime / Poitou-Charentes / France

Localisation: chez Vivien Jean Pays Vals de Saintonge  
vivien, jean (I2372)
 
175 book online
NS1436653
Source Media Type: Book
 
Source Source: S17 (S17)
 
176 book online
NS1436653
Source Media Type: Book
 
Source Source: S19 (S19)
 
177 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F815
 
178 Dâebute comme employâe áa la Banque Molson puis devient gâerant de banque pour la Banque de Montrâeal dans les villes d'Acton-Vale, St-Ours, St-Câesaire, St-Jâerãome et Riviáere-du-Loup. Raboin, Victor (I53)
 
179 Dâecâedâee subitement d'un arrãet cardiaque áa la maison en compagnie que son mari (Pierre) et un couple d'amis. Major, Lorraine (I5)
 
180 Databases of NYC Vital Records:
Marriages: Grooms and Brides
Deaths
Births 
Source Source: S-1704766359 (S-1704766359)
 
181 Descendants of Pierre Lejeune dit Briard I can located at the following E-Link(sw):

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/e/j/Robert-L-Lejeune/PDFGENE1.pdf


http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/lejeunemenard2.htm

THIRTEENTH GENERATION

Pierre LEJEUNE married Marie THIBODEAU 1595.

Pierre Lejeune dit Briard, of Brie, married a daughter of Germain Doucet at Port-Royal c1650. Their older son, also named Pierre dit Briard, married Marie, a daughter of Pierre Thibodeaux, in 1678. The Lejeunes moved several times in subsequent years, first to La Heve in 1686, back to Port-Royal by 1698, to Petite-Rivere, near La Heve, in 1704, then finally to Pigiguit in 1712. Pierre's younger brother, Martin dit Briard (Labriere), married an Indian woman, Marie-Jeanne Kagijonais, in 1684, before marrying Marie, a granddaughter of Jean Gaudet, at Pigiguit in 1699, where his family settled.(15)(17)(18)
TWELFTH GENERATION

Catherine LEJEUNE dit BRIARD (1633, Port Royal) married in 1651 at Port Royal François SAVOIE, born c. 1621, Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France and died in 1678 in Port Royal.

In 1643, 22-year-old Francois Savoie, a farmer from Martaize, arrived in Acadia and married Catherine Lejeune in 1651. They had nine children, only one of whom was a son, Germain, who married into the Breaux clan and fathered 12 children, including five sons who created families of their own. (13)
ELEVENTH GENERATION

Andrée SAVOIE married Jean PRÉGENT before 31 Dec 1693 in Acadie.(1)(15)

Jean Préjean dit LeBreton arrived in Acadia in 1671, soon after the first census was taken, and in 1683 married Andrée, a daughter of François Savoie, at Port-Royal, where most of his family of 12 children, including eight sons, remained. His fourth son Joseph, however, settled at Chepoudy after he married Marie-Louise, a great-granddaughter of Pierre Comeaux. (14)
TENTH GENERATION

Anne PRÉGENT PRÉJEANT, born 1687 in Port Royal, married on 27 July 1705 in Port Royal. François PITRÉ was born in 1682 in Port Royal and died on 6 December 1725 in Port Royal. (2)(15)

NINTH GENERATION

Marguerite PITRÉ (1715, Port Royal- ) married François BOUDREAU (1710, Grand Pré - 1764) before 31 Dec 1733 in Grand Pré. (3)

EIGHTH GENERATION

Charles BOUDREAU married Madeleine CLOUATRE before 31 December 1760 in L'Acadie. Charles was born in Acadie, died on 17 and was buried on 19 Mach 1812 in L'Acadie. Madeleine died on 10 and was buried on 12 March 1800 in L'Acadien. (16)

SEVENTH GENERATION

Joseph Marie LABRECQUE married Marie BOUDREAU on 21 January 1788 in L'Acadie. Joseph was born in 1759, died on 8 December and was buried on 12 December 1830 in St-Athanase-de-Bleury. Marie, daughter of Charles BOUDREAU & Madeleine CLOATRE was born in 1759, died on 12 December and was buried on 14 December 1840 in Henryville. (5)



SIXTH GENERATION

Marguerite LABRECQUE married Joseph SÉNÉSAC on 8 January 1816 in L'Acadie, St-Jean, Québec. Marguerite was born 1796 in Beaumont, Bellechasse, the daughter of Joseph LEBREQUE & Marie BOUDREAU, who were married on 21 January 1788 in St-Luc, Acadie. Marie BOUDREAU, born in 1759, was the daughter of Charles BOUDREAU & Magdeleine CLOUATRE who married in 1756 in Grand Pré, Acadia. (1)(2)



FIFTH GENERATION

Mathilde SÉNÉSAC married Eustache/Eusée GRANGER on 17 Sept 1844 in St. Georges, Canada. Eustache/Eusée GRANGER was the son of Jean Baptiste GRANGER & Marie Osithe CLOUATRE who were married on 16 Sept 1816 in L'Acadie, Comté de St-Jean. Jean-Baptiste was the son of Jean-Baptiste GRANGER & Marie-Angélique GRÉGOIRE. (1)(10)(11)(12)



FOURTH GENERATION

Rosalie GRANGER (1859-1937) married Joseph MÉNARD (1826-1925) on 31 Aug 1881, in Stanbridge, Missisquoi County, Québec, Canada. Joseph MÉNARD was the son of Pierre MÉNARD & Marie Rosalie Sara LUSSIER. Rosalie died on August 20, 1937 in Burlington, VT. Jospeh and Rosale are buried in the Calvary Cemetery in Burlington, VT. (1)(10)

Oliver MAYNARD
Joseph MAYNARD
Henry MAYNARD (1893 - 1953) married Elisabeth (Jandraw) GENDRON
Children
Clara Ena Julia MAYNARD (1915 - )Howard William DELORME (1916 - )

Children
Bruce Henry DELORME (1943 - ) this is my cousin in VT
Beverly DELORME married Bernard PICHE
Grail DELORME



THIRD GENERATION

Oliver MAYNARD/MÉNARD was born in 17 Mar 1897 in Burlington, VT. He died in 27 Jun 1933 in Burlington, VT. He married Gladys Gertrude BRYANT on 7 May 1925 in Burlington, VT. Gladys was born on 8 Jun 1908 and died on 11 Mar 1999 in New London, CT. She was the daughter of Clifton Jackson BRYANT & Florence Gertrude WELLS
Clifton was born 2 Jun 1879 in St. Albans, VT and died 26 March 1950 in Plainville CT. Florence Wells was born in November 1884 in St. Albans, VT. (1)

Children
Clifton Oliver MAYNARD (1925 - 1995)


SECOND GENERATION

Clifton Oliver MAYNARD was born 17 Aug 1925 in Burlington, VT. He died 20 Jan 1995 in New London CT, and Barbara J. NOEL (1929 - )

Children:
Timothy BOSAK (1956 - ) married Catherine S. CANTY (1962 - )
Children
Andrew J. BOSAK (1982 - )
Maureen S. BOSAK (1983 - )

Richard Allan MAYNARD (1930 - )
Clifton Oliver MAYNARD married Mary Julia MORELL (1930 - ) *1st Wife

Children
Lynn Ann MAYNARD (1956 - )
Clifton Alan MAYNARD (1960 - 1987)


FIRST GENERATION

Lynn Ann MAYNARD (1956 - ) married John Tracy BARROWS (1951 - ) 1st Husband

Children
Clifton Tracey BARROWS (1976 - )
Lynn Ann MAYNARD married John Sherman PHILLIPS Jr. (1948 - ) 2nd Husband

Children
John Sherman PHILLIPS III (1983 - )
Lynn Ann MAYNARD married David Fraser MATHIESON (1941 - )3rd Husband



Please use the BACK/RETURN Button on your Browser to
Return to the Previous Page.
Or, the Link below to return to
All My Relations

Index LEJEUNE Index MÉNARD Table of Contents

(1) PRDH - Programme de recherches en démographie historique, Certificat d'union No. 9248.
(2) Ibid., Certificat d'union No. 13037.
(3) Ibid., Certificat d'union No. 23792 & Certificat de famille #18334.
(4) Ibid., Certificat d'union No. 44157. **A subscription to PRDH is needed to access this file.
(5) Ibid., Certificat d'union No. 49306.
(6) Mariages de St-François-Xavier, Verchères (1741-1966), Comp: Irenée Jetté, Pub: Pontbriand, Québec, 1967, pp. 45-46, 208.
(7) Resources at the French Genealogical Society, Tollman, CT, and personal information submitted in
Email messages by Lynn Ménard-Mathieson.
(8) Mariages de la Comté de Missisquoi, 1846-1968, Vols 1 & 2, Pub: Pontbriand, Québec, pp. 357, 255 & 382.
(9) PRDH, Certificat de famille No. 14255.
(10) Ibid., Certificat de famille No. 5378.
(16) Ibid., Certificate d'union No. 44694.
(11) Parish register of Notre-Dame-des-Anges, in Notre-Dame-de- Stanbridge, January 7, 1857, record #M3.
(12) Steven Cormier's website at: http://www.acadiansingray.com/appendices-Acadian%20Pioneers.htm:
99 (Arsenault, Genealogie, 662-64, 1415; White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1048-58; White, Dictionnaire English Supplement, 223-28. Arsenault does not even mention the elder Pierre dit Briard; his information comes from White, who claims that Martin dit Briard married a third time to Marie Arnault (Renaud) dit Grislard in 1729 at Grand Pre. Again, marriage dates differ between Arsenault and White, and, again, I follow White here. White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1048, lists an Edmee or Aimee Lejeune, born c1624, who married Francois Gautreaux, widower of Marie _____, in 1644, no place given, & a Catherine Lejeune, born c.1633, who married Francois Savoie in 1651, again no place given; White gives no parents for these Lejeune women, but in his Dictionnaire English Supplement, 223, he says they were sisters. He concludes on p.225 of the English Supplement that these women were not sisters of the elder Pierre dit Briard. See also West, Atlas of La. Surnames, 101, who cites Arsenault when he says that Lejeunes settled in Acadia as early as 1646. West may be referring to the elder Pierre dit Briard. The elder Pierre dit Briard is not listed in the first Acadian census of 1671. See . White gives neither a birth or death date for Pierre dit Briard the elder, so it's anyone's guess why he does not appear in the first census. Given the family's tendency to move a lot, he may have temporarily left the colony with his family, or he may have died by then)
(13) Ibid., 137 (Arsenault, Genealogie, 794; White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1456-59. Catherine was the sister of Edmee Lejeune, second wife of Francois Gautreaux. The family name also is spelled Savois, Savoy, Savoye)
(14) Ibid., 133. Arsenault, Genealogie, pp. 733-36, 1568-69; White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1351-52; White, Dictionnaire English Supplement, p. 286.
75a. Arsenault, Genealogie, 662-64, 1415; White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1048-58; White, Dictionnaire English Supplement, 223-28. Arsenault does not even mention the elder Pierre dit Briard; his information comes from White, who claims that Martin dit Briard married a third time to Marie Arnault (Renaud) dit Grislard in 1729 at Grand Pre. Again, marriage dates differ between Arsenault and White, and, again, I follow White here. White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1048, lists an Edmee or Aimee Lejeune, born c1624, who married Francois Gautreaux, widower of Marie _____, in 1644, no place given, & a Catherine Lejeune, born c.1633, who married Francois Savoie in 1651, again no place given; White gives no parents for these Lejeune women, but in his Dictionnaire English Supplement, 223, he says they were sisters. He concludes on p.225 of the English Supplement that these women were not sisters of the elder Pierre dit Briard. See also West, Atlas of La. Surnames, 101, who cites Arsenault when he says that Lejeunes settled in Acadia as early as 1646. West may be referring to the elder Pierre dit Briard. The elder Pierre dit Briard is not listed in the first Acadian census of 1671. See Hebert., T., Acadian-Cajun Genealogy & History. White gives neither a birth or death date for Pierre dit Briard the elder, so it's anyone's guess why he does not appear in the first census. Given the family's tendency to move a lot, he may have temporarily left the colony with his family, or he may have died by then.
(17) http://www.jasenbenwah.ca/marie-jeanne_kagijonias.html: Father Clarence-Joseph D'Entremont, in his book, ``Le Canada-Francais Documents sur l'Acadie,'' asserts that the Pierre II who arrived in Acadia as a child married a Micmac woman. The census of 1686 listed Pierre Lejeune III as being married to Marie Thibodeau and Martin Lejeune as being married to Marie-Jeanne Kagijonias, a member of the Micmac tribe. After Marie-Jeanne's death, Martin married Marie Gaudet, the daughter of Jehan (Jean) Gaudet and Marie-Jeanne Henry. A 1693 census lists a sister to Pierre III and Martin named Jeanne, who was married to Francois Joseph, a member of the Micmac tribe.
(18) http://www.metisduquebec.ca/genealogie/html/dat53.htm#18
Lejeune\Briard, Sexe: Masculin ; Conjoint: Indienne, Sexe: Féminin
Enfant(s): Lejeune, Edmée, Lejeune\Briard, Pierre, Lejeune, Catherine
(15) The following notes were submitted by Lynn Ménard-Mathieson in December 2006.

Notes:
http://www.rongaudet2001.com/acadian/9610.htm
Andrée Savoie-[9610] 1
Born: 1667, Port-Royal, Acadia 317
Married: Abt 1683, Port-Royal, Acadia 947
Andrée married Jean Préjean Dit Lebreton-[9598] [MRIN:1174] about 1683 in Port-Royal, Acadia.947 (Jean Préjean Dit Lebreton-[9598] was born in 1651 in France 947 and died on 6 Jun 1733 in Port-Royal, Acadia.)
317 Ibid, volume 2, Port-Royal, page 795.
947 Ibid, volume 2, Port-Royal, page 733.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/a/l/l/Sue--A-Allen/GENE6-0003.html#CHILD12
12. ANDREE3 SAVOIE,METIS INDIAN (CATHERINE2 LEJEUNE,METIS INDIAN, INDIAN WOMAN TRIBE1 MICMAC) was born 1667 in ACADIE, and died Abt. 1700 in ACADIE?. She married JEAN DIT LEBRETON PREJEAN 1683 in ACADIE?.

Child of ANDREE SAVOIE and JEAN PREJEAN is:
19. i. JOSEPH4 PREJEAN,METIS INDIAN, b. 1696, ACADIE?; d. Abt. 1700, ACADIE?.

http://www.acadiansingray.com/appendices-Acadian%20Pioneers.htm
Jean Prejean dit LeBreton arrived in Acadia in 1671, soon after the first census was taken, and in 1683 married Andree, a daughter of Francois Savoie, at Port-Royal, where most of his family of 12 children, including eight sons, remained. His fourth son Joseph, however, settled at Chepoudy after he married Marie-Louise, a great-granddaughter of Pierre Comeaux.133

133. Arsenault, Genealogie, 733-36, 1568-69; White, Dictionnaire Acadiennes, 1351-52; White, Dictionnaire English Supplement, 286.
 
of Brie, Pierre Lejeune dit Briard (I2228)
 
182 Detail information on Mathieu Desgoutin:
Acadians in Louisiana

DE GOUTIN de Ville

[DAY-goo-tanh duh VILLE]

ACADIA

This family is truly the exception among Acadians who emigrated to Louisiana. Mathieu de Goutin, the family's progenitor in Acadia, was, in fact, no colonist at all. Born in France in c1663 to a family of the lesser nobility, he ingratiated himself to an influential marquis and came to Port-Royal in 1688 to serve as the King's lieutenant général civil et criminel, or "general representative for justice," replacing the aging Michel Boudrot in August of that year. Mathieu also served as écrivain, or colonial secretary, as conseiller, or counselor, and as trésorier, or paymaster, at Port-Royal. In 1691, he was granted a seigneurie at Mouscoudabouet, today's Musquodoboit, on the Atlantic side of the peninsula.

In c1689, as Acadian Governor Louis-Alexandre de Friches de Menneval lamented, Mathieu married "foolishly to a peasant's daughter"--Jeanne Thibodeau, who was only 17 years old at the time of her marriage. Jeanne's father was Pierre Thibodeau, who had come to the colony in 1654 as a young lieutenant serving with Emmanuel Le Borgne de Bélisle and married a daughter of Jean Thériot in c1660. Jeanne, named after her mother, was Thibodeau's seventh child and sixth daughter, one of 16 children by his only wife! Menneval was no fan of the sturdy colonist. About the time of Jeanne Thibodeau's marriage to Mathieu De Goutin, the governor briefly imprisoned and fined her father for trading brandy to the Indians. In the late 1690s, under Menneval's successor, Joseph Robinau de Villebon, Pierre and his sons explored and founded the Acadian settlement of Chepoudy on the upper Baie Française, now the Bay of Fundy, so Thibodeau was no peasant.

Mathieu de Goutin's "foolish" marriage "to a peasant's daughter" produced 13 children, all but one of them born at Port-Royal. Two of their six sons married into the Aubert de La Chesnaye, Puypéroux de La Fosse, and Caron families; the other four sons survived childhood but did not marry. Five of their seven daughters married into the Hertel de Cournoyer, de Saint-Rémy, Duboisberthelot, Boucher, and Sabatier families.

Mathieu's kinship to Pierre Thibodeau had its consequences. It made him an enemy of the irascible Menneval, who wrote in 1689 that De Goutin was "an undeserving, worthless character, ... (who is) quite stubbornly convinced of his ability, ... (and) sure that the two offices he holds will give him a rank and authority here which are, if not above, at least equal to that of the governor." Mathieu shared an equal contempt for the governor and the colonial clergy whom the governor championed. The conflict between the two colonial officials led to Mathieu's recall, but luckily for him war intervened. In 1790, during King William's War, New Englanders under Sir William Phips of Boston captured Port-Royal. Phips took both the governor and the young judge as prisoners of war but soon released them. Menneval returned to France while Mathieu went first to Rivière St.-Jean and then to Canada before sailing to France to plead his case to the King. The effort paid off. In August 1792, the King granted Mathieu a signeury at Mouscoudabouet, today's Musquodoboit Harbor, an Acadian/Mi'kmaq settlement on the Atlantic side of the peninsula. In 1796, he received a second seigneury at Pointe-aux-Chênes, today's Oak Point, on Rivière St.-Jean. He and his family did not live on either seigneury but remained at the colonial capital. In August 1796, in one of the last campaigns of King William's War, Mathieu accompanied Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville, the future founder of Louisiana, in an attack on English Fort William Henry at Pemiquid, today's Bristol, Maine. (It was Iberville's destruction of Fort William Henry that led to Colonel Benjamin Church's punitive attack on Chignecto, Acadia, later in the year.) Mathieu returned to France after his venture at Pemiquid and was back at Fort Nashwaak on Rivière St.-Jean, the colonial capital under Villebon, in 1697. Mathieu clashed with Villebon and his successors as well. Jacques-François de Memberton de Brouillon, governor at Port-Royal in the early 1700s, complained that De Goutin was "hardly in a position to make good judgments [as the colony's chief judge] ... because a third of the settlers are relatives of his wife." However, Mathieu got along well with Daniel d'Auger de Subercase, who succeeded to power in 1706 and proved to be Acadia's last French governor. Mathieu's oldest son, François-Marie, served as an army cadet at Port-Royal under Subercase, who was so impressed with the young man's performance during Queen Anne's War that he "considered recommending his promotion to second ensign."

The De Goutin family's fortunes took a turn for the worse in 1710. Queen Anne's War had been raging in North America for eight years when New Englanders captured Port-Royal one last time. After the surrender of the capital in October, Mathieu again returned to France, taking his wife and a dozen children with him; oldest son François-Marie, now 20, followed his family to France. Mathieu's thirteenth and final child, a daughter, was born at Nantes in c1711, but the family did not remain in the mother country very long. In January 1714, after the Peace of Utrecht awarded peninsula Acadia, including Port-Royal, to Britain but retained Île Royale and Île St.-Jean for France, the King appointed Mathieu as scrivener on Île Royale, but he did not hold this important position very long. Mathieu died on Île Royale that Christmas, in his early 50s. One of his biographers captures the complexity of the man and his contribution to Acadian history: "Traditionally, Mathieu de Goutin has been described, somewhat unfairly, as an 'unscrupulous mischief maker.' Though his arrogance and vanity are quite apparent, it would appear nevertheless that he was a capable official. Indeed, his superiors persisted in recognizing this for 22 years. Because one of the functions of effective civil officials was to serve as a restraint upon the otherwise near-absolute power of the governor, it is perhaps as much for this reason, as for his alliances among the inhabitants, that Mathieu de Goutin also enjoyed the confidence of the Acadian peasantry, who had acquired long before a natural distaste for the inflexibility of colonial administration."

In September 1715, Jeanne Thibodeau, now a widow with 11 minor children, requested "the election of a guardian for them." For a time, she and her children received rations from the King's stores. Most of her children remained on Île Royale. Oldest son Françoise-Marie, called sieur like his father, served as an officer in the regular colonial troops, as a colonial official on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean, married twice, and created a large family; he fathered 11 children, including seven sons, by two wives; all of his children were born at Louisbourg on Île Royale. Youngest son Joseph de Ville became an army officer, also was called sieur, and was the only other son to create a family of his own The four middle sons--Alexandre-Abraham, called Abraham, Mathieu, Jacques, and Antoine--survived childhood and were called sieur, but all died "without heirs, never having been married." Five of the seven De Goutin daughters married well, to army officers and colonial officials. Jeanne Thibodeau died at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in April 1741, in her early 70s. She never remarried. François-Marie died on Île St.-Jean in January 1752, in his early 60s. At least one of his sisters, Jeanne, was deported with her family from Île Royale to La Rochelle, France, in 1758 during Le Grand Dérangement.

LOUISIANA

Joseph de Goutin de Ville was, indeed, the first Acadian in Louisiana. But though he was born and raised in greater Acadia, and his mother's family was a large one there, giving him many cousins, he came to Louisiana not as a harried exile, like many of his cousins, but as a young army officer, still a bachelor, assigned to service in a French colony. He arrived in Louisiana, in fact, decades before his cousins' Grand Dérangement.

Descendants of Joseph DE GOUTIN De Ville (1705-late 1760s or 1770s)

Joseph de Ville, sixth and youngest son of Mathieu de Goutin, colonial official, and Jeanne Thibodeau, was born at Port-Royal in March 1705 during Queen Anne's War. Joseph was only the second of his parents' many sons to create a family of his own; all of his five brothers survived childhood, but only he and his oldest brother, François-Marie, took a wife. When Joseph was five years old, a British force captured Port-Royal, and his father took the family to France. When Joseph was nine, his father received an appointment as scrivener on the French-controlled island of Île Royale, and Joseph followed his family to Louisbourg, which the French transformed into a fortress. Joseph's father died in December 1714, soon after the family moved to Île Royale. Joseph came of age at Louisbourg, became an army officer, and served "five years in the Mousquetaires." He came to New Orleans in c1732 as a 27-year-old lieutenant and was promoted to captain in 1737. In 1740, Governor Bienville, who thought that Joseph was age 32, when he was 35, reported that De Velle, as he called him, "serves well," but was "a bit restless." Joseph married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jean Caron, at New Orleans in July 1747; she was a native of the city; Joseph was 42 years old at the time of the wedding and perhaps still in the service, and Marie-Jeanne was only 15. They raised a large family, including at least five sons and three daughters. Not surprisingly, most of the godfathers for Joseph's children were fellow officers, some of them chevaliers of the Order of St.-Louis. A daughter married into the Peyroux family. In June 1764, Joseph received a "complete" 50 x 50-arpent land grand on Bayou Teche, near where Bayou Fuselier flows into the upper Teche, but there is no evidence that he and his family lived there. (Interestingly, it was near Joseph de Ville's land grant that his kinsman, Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil, settled his party of 200 exiles in the spring of 1765.) According to genealogist/historian Stephen A. White, Joseph de Ville was the "Denville" who harbored Acadian participants in the October 1768 revolt against Spanish Governor Ulloa at New Orleans. One source says that Joseph died between 1768 and 1778; if so, he would have been in his 60s or early 70s. In May 1786, his widow lay claim to 50 x 40 arpents of land along the east bank of the Teche granted by Spanish Governor Miró, the title for which was confirmed by Governor Carondelet in May 1794 and by Morales, a Spanish official, in April 1802 (this probably was her husband's original French grant of June 1764), but there is no evidence that she and his children moved there. She sold the land to fellow colonist Charles Jumonville de Viller in July 1802, who promptly sold it to Alexandre Delhomme of Attakapas.

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste-Joseph was born at New Orleans in June 1751. In March 1764, at age 12 1/2, he stood as godfather at New Orleans for 3 1/2-year-old Jean-Baptiste, son of Jean Poirier and Madeleine Richard, among the first Acadians to reach Louisiana. Did he marry?

2

Charles was born at New Orleans in October 1757.

3

Louis was born at New Orleans in January 1760.

4

Joseph, fils, born at New Orleans in June 1761, served as captain of the "fixed Louisiana regiment" and also of the militia. He used the surname De Ville de Goutin Bellechasse or Villechasse, served briefly was commandant of Spanish Fort San Fernando de las Barrancas at present-day Memphis, Tennessee, during the late Spanish period, and commanded the Louisiana militia in 1804-05, during the early American period. He married Marie Josèphe Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of Étienne Lalande d'Alcour, probably at New Orleans by the early 1800s. Their son Jacques Émile Adolphe was born at New Orleans in June 1808, and Jean Louis in August 1814. ...

5

Youngest son François-Marie was born at New Orleans in June 1765.

.

Daughter Marie Françoise, widow of Pierre Charles Peyroux, died at New Orleans in June 1821; she was 69 years old.

Daughter Marie-Grégoire, "unmarried," died at New Orleans in September 1824; the priest who recorded her burial said that Marie Grégoire had been born in May 1750, so she was 74 years old at the time of her death.

CONCLUSION

From the late 1680s to 1710, the De Goutins were a privileged family in Acadia. Mathieu, the family's progenitor, was second only to the governor in power and influence; at one time, he held four important positions--chief judge of civil and criminal matters, counselor, colonial secretary, and paymaster--and in 1691 he was granted a seigneur on the Atlantic side of peninsula Acadia. He complained at one point that he had "no set time for drinking and eating, (for) I am more busy on feast days and Sundays than on working days, (because) the settlers use these days to conduct their business when they come to Mass." One of those settlers was Pierre Thibodeau. When De Goutin married one of Thibodeau's daughters, the young official established a lasting connection with a significant number of settlers, from Port-Royal all the way around to the upper Fundy settlements. One Acadian governor complained that it would be difficult for De Goutin to render an objective judgment in many civil and criminal cases "because a third of the settlers are related to his wife." De Goutin may have been, in fact, the only colonial official that the Acadians trusted to look after their best interests. His long career in Acadia ended with Britain's final seizure of Port-Royal in 1710. Although De Goutin was given an important position on Île Royale, now Cape Breton Island, when the French established a colony there in 1714, he died within a year of his appointment. His wife and children--they had 13 of them--remained on Île Royale. De Goutin's oldest son, François-Marie, also became a colonial official, on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, and was nearly as highly placed as his father had been at Port-Royal.

It was De Goutin's youngest son, Joseph de Ville, who was the first Acadian native to emigrate to Louisiana. In c1732, Joseph came to Louisiana as a young lieutenant, having served five years in the King's Musketeers. He was promoted to captain in 1737, at age 32. In 1747, age 42, he married a local Creole girl who was only in her teens and remained in the colony. By the early 1750s, the retired officer was a captain in the colonial militia and "settled (in business)" at New Orleans. He fathered at least eight children, including five sons, all born at New Orleans. At least one of his sons, Joseph, fils, married and fathered sons of his own; as captain in the Spanish regiment and then as a militia officer, Joseph, fils, who used the surname De Ville de Goutin Bellechasse or Villechasse, served briefly as commandant of Spanish Fort San Fernando de las Barrancas at present-day Memphis, Tennessee, during the late Spanish period and as Louisiana militia commander during the early American period.

Joseph de Ville, père's kinship with many of his fellow Acadians may have been a factor in so many of them coming to Louisiana. Scholars note that Olivier Landry of Chignecto, whom the British had deported to Georgia, was a kinsman of the De Goutins (Olivier's paternal grandmother, Marie Thibodeau, was Joseph de Ville's mother's older sister). As the story goes, while Olivier and his family languished at Savannah at the end of the final war with Britain, they somehow communicated with their cousin in New Orleans, who informed them that the French authorities in Louisiana would welcome Acadians there. The Landrys and three other families--the Cormiers, Poiriers, and Richards, 21 in all--left Savannah for Louisiana via Mobile in December 1763 and reached New Orleans the following February--the first recorded Acadian families in Louisiana. Olivier and Joseph may have enjoyed a tearful reunion, and it would be no surprise if Joseph was kin to other members of the party as well (De Goutin's eldest son Jean-Baptiste De Ville, only 12 years old, served as godfather for 3-year-old Jean-Baptiste, one of Jean Poirier's sons, soon after the party reached New Orleans). Olivier, Jean, and their fellow exiles went on to Cabanocé, on the river above the city, and sent word out by the remarkable Acadian grapevine that the French authorities in Louisiana had indeed welcomed them to the colony. Exactly a year later, in February 1765, the first large contingent of Acadian exiles, 200 men, women, and children led by resistance fighter Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil (another kinsman of Joseph de Goutin de Ville; Broussard's wife, now deceased, was a niece of Joseph de Ville's mother), reached New Orleans from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, and settled on Bayou Teche, not far from a land grant held by Joseph de Ville. Hundreds more Acadians came from Halifax later that year, and more from Maryland in the next four years.

It is possible, then, that Joseph de Goutin de Ville, the first Acadian in Louisiana, played a significant role in his kinsmen's mass migration to the lower Mississippi valley. Joseph de Ville's contribution was so significant, in fact, that Acadian genealogist/historian Stephen A. White calls him "the Godfather of the New Acadia in Louisiana." White adds that during the October 1768 Creole-led rebellion against the unpopular Spanish Governor Antonio de Ulloa, the Acadians who participated in the uprising rallied at Joseph de Goutin's home in New Orleans, evidence that the "first Acadian" remained close to his fellow Acadiennes.

The family's name also is spelled Degoutin, Degoutins, Desgoutin, Deville, Deville Degouin, Deville Degoutain, Deville Degoutin, De Ville De Goutin, Deville Des Goutins, Deville Des Gouttain, De Ville De Goutin Bellechasse, Deville Degoutin Villechasse.

Sources: Clark, Acadia, 116, 118, 147, note 72; Conrad, Attakapas Domesday Book, 1:35, 47-48; De Ville, Mississippi Valley Mélange, 2:14, source of quote & Joseph's military career; Faragher, A Great & Noble Scheme, 430; Eric R. Krause, "GOUTIN, François-Marie," DCB, 3:264-65, source of quote; McDermott, ed., The Spanish in the Mississippi Valley, 45 n.18; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16; Bernard Pothier, "GOUTIN, Mathieu de," in DCB, 2:257-58, source of quotes; White, DGFA-1, 756-59, 1508-09; White, DGFA-1 English, 155-56, source of quote; Stephen A. White, "The First Acadian in Louisiana: Joseph DE GOUTIN de Ville," in ; Stephen A. White, "Joseph DE GOUTIN de Ville: The Godfather of the New Acadian in Louisiana," at ; .

Settlement Abbreviations
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)
Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community.

Name Arrived Settled Profile
*Joseph DE GOUTIN de Ville 01 1740s NO born 19 Mar 1705, baptized next day, Port-Royal; son of Mathieu DE GOUTIN, colonial official, & Jeanne THIBODEAUX; moved to France 1710, age 5; on Île Royale 1714; became an army officer; served 5 years in the Musketeers; arrived LA c1732, age 27, a lieutenant; the first Acadian native to settle in LA; promoted captain in 1737, age 32; married, age 42, Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jean CARON & Marie-Anne or Anne-Marie, called Anne, MONIQUE, 29 Jul 1747, New Orleans; served as captain of colonial militia
NOTES

01. Not in Wall of Names because of the circumstance of his arrival. White, DGFA-1, 757, calls him Joseph DE GOUTIN de Ville, & provides his biographical information, including details of his marriage not found in NOAR. Joseph's godparents were Sr. de Gannes "capne de la garrison" & Anne DE GOUTIN, his older sister, who was 11 years old in 1705.

Stephen A. White, "The First Acadian in Louisiana: Joseph DE GOUTIN de Ville," in , says that "Joseph had connections with a regiment who[sic] was involved in both Ile Royale and in Louisiana. So he arranged for a position in New Orleans and moved there about 1746." This implies that he was captured at Louisbourg in 1745, was released by the British, & allowed to go on to LA. De Ville, Mississippi Valley Mélange, 2:14, citing a report by LA Gov. Bienville, dated 1740, in the Archives Nationales de France, shows that Joseph came to LA much earlier. Gov. Bienville says of DE VELLE [DE GOUTIN]: "He served five years in the Mousquetaires and arrived in the colony in 1732 in the grade of Lieutenant; Captain in 1737. He serves well; a bit restless." So one wonders where White got his arrival date of 1746.

Marie-Jeanne CARON's birth/baptismal record can be found in NOAR, 1:41 (SLC, B1, 14), & says she was born 18 Nov 1731, probably in the city. Thus, she was only 15 years old when she married Joseph De Ville; he was 42 years old. Her parents' marriage record, dated 20 Mar 1721, "at Old Biloxi," is in NOAR, 1:41, 191 (SLC, M1, 15), & calls her mother Anne MONI. Her paternal grandparents were Louis [CARON] & Marguerite DUHAMEL, her maternal grandparents Simon [MONI] & Françoise PELLETIER. Her mother's surname also is given as MONIE. One wonders when her parents came to New Orleans from Biloxi & where White found her & Joseph's marriage record.

That Joseph served not only as an officer in the regular service but also as an officer of the LA colonial militia can be seen in the baptismal records of 4 of his children in NOAR, 2:93-94. He was, according to one of the records, a "militia captain." He also was "settled (in business)" at New Orleans by Nov 1750. See White, DGFA-1 English, 156, a listing of his parents' children, dated 19 Nov 1750, that calls him Sr. Joseph DE GOUTIN de Ville.

In "Joseph de Goutin de Ville: The Godfather of the New Acadian in Louisiana," at , Stephen A. White says that Joseph DE GOUTIN received his land grant at Attakapas in 1764, that it was 50 x 50 arpents "at the northern edge of the Attakapas District at what is now Sec. 37, T8S/R5E on the East side of Bayou Teche right below its junction with Bayou Fuselier and across from the vast purchase Gabriel FUSELIER de la Claire made from the Indians in 1760." See also Conrad, Attakapas Domesday Book, 1:35. A detailed map in Conrad, 1:34, shows DE GOUTIN's land just south of the town of Arnaudville. The BROUSSARDs settled much farther down the Teche, at Fausse Pointe near present-day Loreauville, below the Poste des Attakapas.  
Family F16453
 
183 DOD 25 Jan 1941 Address 342 W 30th St Manhattan, NY Age: 73 Occupation: Housework, Last employed: May 1938 Birthplace: US Father: Edward Cunningham, US born Mother Mary Mc Closkey, Ireland Burial: Calvary Cemetery Source Source: S-1704777219 (S-1704777219)
 
184 Dorothy Simons McDonald says Fred Sr had a step brother named Johnny Cunningham in Philadelphia
Somehow connected to the Wannamakers

Family had a summer place on the canal neas phillsburgh New Jersey on PA- NJ state line 
Simons, Frederick W II (P29)
 
185 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Simons, Dorothy Hope (P5)
 
186 Downloaded 11 Nov 2007 Source Source: S-2122314040 (S-2122314040)
 
187 E Link can be found at:
http://www.nosorigines.qc.ca/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?pid=932167&lng=en 
Thibodeau, Odessa (I2027)
 
188 E link information on Pierre Poulin can be found at:

http://genealogy-canada.org/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?genealogy=Pierre_Poulin&pid=115885&lng=en&partID=115886 
Poulin, Pierre (I2109)
 
189 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F794
 
190 E-Link = http://www.claude.dupras.com/les_jean.htm


Family history of the ancestor Pierre Jean

This genealogy was prepared with the collaboration of the genealogist Jean-Jacques Lebeau.

The story of John and his descendants was established on 11 generations.



The ancestor Pierre Jean was born and was baptized into the Christian faith, Catholic, Roman February 19, 1645, in the St. Bartholomew parish in the city of La Rochelle, in the former province of Aunis (Charente Now -Maritime), France. Like most men of his time, it will probably have been good practitioner. Pierre was the third child and second son born of the couple "John Hérault".

In the spring of 1663, when he was a little over 18 years, Jean Pierre signed a contract of employment to come to work in New France. In 1664, we find him as "committed" to Pierre Denis, Sieur de La Ronde. Jean Pierre crossed the Atlantic on the ship Royal Flute Brouage or vessel L'Aigle d'Or. This crossing was disastrous since 60 deceased passengers were thrown into the sea and 75 others were filed in Newfoundland. At the time of his arrival on 22 September 1663, it is thought that Peter would have been a patient passengers, who have struggled to regain their strength. After reading a report on the health status of immigrants who arrived in fall 1663, which was delivered on June 18, 1664, the Sovereign Council decided to return to France ten immigrants Jean Pierre on one of the boats to La Rochelle in the fall 1664. Despite his precarious health situation, it seems that Peter was sufficiently impressed by the new France during his first stay and he decided to come again settle, a few years later.

Jean Pierre, when he was 23 years and 5 months, married his first wife, Françoise Favreau, 26 years old and 6 months and daughter of Jacques Favreau and Mary Martineau, in the city of La Rochelle, in old province of Aunis, France, July 8, 1668.

Indeed, Jean Pierre signed a contract before the notary Teuleron, La Rochelle, Aunis, in March 1669 as "committed". He immigrated later in Quebec City in New France in the summer of 1669, accompanied by his wife, Françoise Favreau, his two brothers, Helie and Vivien Jean, and his sister-in Gaignet Mary, the wife of Helie. When they came to settle in the colony, Peter was aged a little over 24 years, while Francoise was aged just over 27 years.

We know that this marriage was a period of a little over 55 years and ended with the death of Frances, at the beginning of August in the year 1723, in L'Islet in New France.

After 1 year of widowhood, old perky Pierre Jean, aged 79 years and 6 months, married his second wife, the young widow Marie-Anne Bourassa, aged about 44 years, probably in St-Jean-Port-Joli, New France, in August of the year 1724. There was a marriage contract between two future husband before notary Étienne Janneau on 13 August 1724. the second marriage ended after a period of about 3 years, in 1727, by the death of Peter John.

Jean Pierre was about 82 years old at his death and was buried about 1727 in the parish of St-Jean-Port-Joli, in New France (now Quebec, Canada). We do not have more precise data on the circumstances and dates of death and burial.
 
Joslain, Marthe (I2384)
 
191 E-link about Alexandre

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/e/a/David-P-Meaux-TX/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0121.html 
Family F846
 
192 E-link address:

http://www.claude.dupras.com/les_jean.htm


Chronique familiale de l?ancêtre Pierre Jean

Cette généalogie a été préparée avec la collaboration du généalogiste Jean-Jacques LEBEAU.

L'histoire de Jean et de ses descendants a été établie sur 11 générations.



L'ancêtre Pierre Jean est né et a été baptisé dans la foi chrétienne, catholique, romaine le 19 février 1645, dans la paroisse St-Barthélemi, dans la ville de La Rochelle, dans l'ancienne province d'Aunis (maintenant la Charente-Maritime), en France. Comme la plupart des hommes de son époque, il aura probablement été bon pratiquant. Pierre était le troisième enfant et le second fils né du couple «Jean-Hérault».

Au printemps de l'année 1663, alors qu'il était âgé d'un peu plus de 18 ans, Pierre Jean signait un contrat d'engagement pour venir travailler en Nouvelle-France. En 1664, on le retrouve comme «engagé» de monsieur Pierre Denis, sieur de La Ronde. Pierre Jean a traversé l'Atlantique sur le vaisseau La Flûte Royale de Brouage ou le vaisseau L'Aigle d'Or. Cette traversée fut désastreuse puisque 60 passagers décédés furent jetés à la mer et 75 autres furent déposés à Terre-Neuve. Au moment de son arrivée, le 22 septembre 1663, on pense que Pierre aurait fait partie des passagers malades, qui auraient eu de la difficulté à retrouver leurs forces. Après avoir pris connaissance d'un rapport sur l'état de santé des immigrants arrivés à l'automne 1663, qui lui fut remis le 18 juin 1664, le Conseil Souverain décidait de renvoyer en France une dizaine d'immigrants dont Pierre Jean, sur un des bateaux en partance pour La Rochelle, à l'automne 1664. Malgré sa situation de santé précaire, il semble que Pierre ait été suffisamment séduit par la Nouvelle-France lors de son premier séjour et qu'il ait décidé de venir à nouveau s'y établir, quelques années plus tard.

Pierre Jean, alors qu'il était âgé de 23 ans et 5 mois, épousait en premières noces, Françoise Favreau, âgée de 26 ans et 6 mois et fille de Jacques Favreau et de Marie Martineau, dans la ville de La Rochelle, dans l'ancienne province d'Aunis, en France, le 8 juillet 1668.

En effet, Pierre Jean signait un contrat devant le notaire Teuleron, à La Rochelle, en Aunis, en mars 1669, comme «engagé». Il immigrait, par la suite, à Québec, en Nouvelle-France, à l'été de l'année 1669, accompagné de son épouse, Françoise Favreau, de ses deux frères, Hélie et Vivien Jean, et de sa belle-soeur, Marie Gaignet, l'épouse d'Hélie. Lorsqu'ils sont venus s'installer dans la colonie, Pierre était âgé d'un peu plus de 24 ans tandis que Françoise était âgée d'un peu plus de 27 ans.

Nous savons que ce mariage a été d'une durée d'un peu plus de 55 ans et qu'il s'est terminé par le décès de Françoise, au début du mois d'août de l'année 1723, à L'Islet, en Nouvelle-France.

Après 1 an de veuvage, le guilleret vieillard Pierre Jean, âgé de 79 ans et 6 mois, épousait en secondes noces, la jeune veuve Marie-Anne Bourassa, âgée d'environ 44 ans, probablement à St-Jean-Port-Joli, en Nouvelle-France, au mois d'août de l'année 1724. Il y a eu contrat de mariage entre les deux futurs époux, devant le notaire Étienne Janneau, le 13 août 1724. Ce second mariage se terminait après une durée d'environ 3 ans, en 1727, par le décès de Pierre Jean.

Pierre Jean avait environ 82 ans à son décès et a été inhumé vers 1727, dans la paroisse St-Jean-Port-Joli, en Nouvelle-France (maintenant la province de Québec, au Canada). Nous n'avons pas de données plus précises sur les circonstances et les dates de son décès et de son inhumation.


Génération 1

1. PIERRE2 JEAN (VIVIEN1 et Suzanne Hérault) est né vers 1643 à la Paroisse Saint-Maurice, Aunis. La Rochelle. Il épousa FRANÇOISE FAVREAU le 8 juillet 1668 en France, fille de JACQUES FAVREAU et MARIE MARTINEAU.



Les enfants de PIERRE JEAN et FRANÇOISE FAVREAU sont:

i. VIVIEN3 JEAN, n. 10 décembre 1672, Québec.

2. ii. PIERRE JEAN, n. 11 mars 1676, Québec.

iii. LOUISE JEAN, n. 18 mai 1678, Québec; d. 1 janvier 1750, L'islet; m. JACQUES CHOUINARD, 2 juin 1692, Québec.

iv. ANTOINE JEAN, n. 7 juin 1681, Québec; d. 3 décembre 1705.





Génération 2



2. PIERRE3 JEAN (PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le 11 mars 1676 à Québec. Il épousa MARIE-MADELEINE PRINCEAU le1 juin 1700 à Québec, fille de LOUIS PRINCEAU et MARIE-REINE CHARPENTIER.



Les enfants de PIERRE JEAN et MARIE-MADELEINE PRINCEAU sont:

3. i. PIERRE4 JEAN, n. octobre 1715, L'islet; d. 22 janvier 1788, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

ii. FRANÇOIS PIERRE JEAN, n. vers 1701; d. 30 septembre 1770, Saint-Jean Port Joli; m. MARIE-CÉCILE LECLERS, FRANCOEUR, 24 novembre 1727, L'islet.

iii. MARIE-LOUISE JEAN, n. 26 novembre 1702, Cap-Saint-Ignace; m. JOSEPH THIBAULT, 25 octobre 1725, Charlesbourg.

iv. MARIE-JEANNE-ANNE JEAN, n. 3 juin 1704, Cap-Saint-Ignace; d. 9 décembre 1749, Québec; m. ANTOINE DUCROS, LATERREUR, 8 janvier 1725, Québec.

v. MARIE-REINE JEAN, n. vers 1705; d. 9 décembre 1769, à Lapocatière; m. JEAN-BERNARD OUELLET, 20 janvier 1730, L'islet.

vi. MARIE-GENEVIÈVE JEAN, n. 27 mars 1706, Cap-Saint-Ignace; d. 9 juillet 1733, Cap-Saint-Ignace; m. CLAUDE CAOUETTE, 28 août 1729, Québec.

vii. MARIE-MADELEINE JEAN, n. 24 décembre 1707, L'islet; d. 31 octobre 1772, Rivière-Ouelle; m. PIERRE GAGNON, 8 novembre 1729, Rivière-Ouelle.

viii. JOSEPH-PIERRE JEAN, n. 5 septembre 1709, Rivière Ouelle; d. 9 septembre 1709, Rivière Ouelle.

ix. MARIE-FRANÇOISE JEAN, n. vers 1710; d. 21 octobre 1773, Kamouraska; m. GUILLAUME PELLETIER, 1 décembre 1731, L'islet.

x. MARIE-CLAIRE JEAN, n. vers 1711; m. JOSEPH-FRANÇOIS THIBAULT, 29 octobre 1738, L'islet.

xi. ANONYME JEAN, n. 5 mars 1713, L'islet; d. 5 mars 1730, L'islet.

xii. PIERRE JEAN, n. mars 1714.

xiii. MARIE-MARGUERITE JEAN, n. 24 mai 1717, L'islet; d. 7 mars 1755, Saint-Roch-Des-Aulnaies; m. FRANÇOIS THIBOUTOT, 18 novembre 1743, Saint-Roch-Des-Aulnaies.





Génération 3



3. PIERRE4 JEAN (PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le octobre 1715 à L'islet, et meurt le 22 janvier 1788 à Saint-Jean Port Joli. Il épousa MARIE-JOSEPHE MIGNIER, LAGACÉ le 6 février 1742 à Lapocatière, fille de MICHEL LAGACÉ et MARIE-ANGÉLIQUE THIBAULT. Elle décède le 9 mars 1786 à Saint-Jean Port Joli.



Les enfants de PIERRE JEAN et MARIE-JOSEPHE MIGNIER sont:

4. i. PIERRE5 JEAN, n. vers 1742; d. 22 avril 1792, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

ii. FRANÇOIS-XAVIER JEAN, n. vers 1744; m. MARGUERITE-ANGÉLIQUE BÉLANGER, BONSECOUR, 2 octobre 1770, L'islet.

iii. MARIE-ANGÉLIQUE JEAN, n. vers 1746; m. JEAN-FRANÇOIS MORIN, 8 janvier 1776, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

iv. LOUIS JEAN, n. vers 1748; d. 29 janvier 1756, L'islet.

v. MARIE-FÉLICITÉ JEAN, n. vers 1754; m. JEAN-BAPTISTE-GERMAIN HUDON, BEAULIEU, 29 octobre 1776, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

vi. RÉGIS JEAN, n. vers 1756; m. MARIE-JOSEPHE GAUVIN, 23 février 1778, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

vii. MARIE-REINE JEAN, n. vers 1759; m. ALEXANDRE FOURNIER, 24 février 1783, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

viii. MARIE-CLAIRE JEAN, n. vers 1762; m. VICTOR-ATHANASE PELLETIER, 10 janvier 1785, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

ix. MARIE-JUDITH JEAN, n. vers 1764; m. JEAN-BAPTISTE CARON, 26 septembre 1785, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

x. MARIE-FRANÇOISE JEAN, n. vers 1766; m. PIERRE-BASILE CHOUINARD, LARIVIÈRE, 27 février 1786, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

xi. MICHEL JEAN, n. 21 juillet 1767, L'islet.





Génération 4



4. PIERRE5 JEAN (PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né vers 1742, et meurt le 22 avril 1792 à Saint-Jean Port Joli. Il épousa MARIE JOSEPHTE DUBÉ le 14 mai 1764 à Saint-Roch-Des-Aulnaies Comté-L'islet, fille de SIMON DUBÉ et MARGUERITE GAUDIN. Elle meurt le 26 novembre 1825 à Saint-Jean Port Joli.



Les enfants de PIERRE JEAN et MARIE DUBÉ sont:

5. i. AUGUSTIN6 JEAN, n. 27 septembre 1771, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

ii. MARIE-JOSEPHE JEAN, n. 13 février 1765, L'islet; m. JEAN-MARIE MORNEAU, 7 janvier 1788, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

iii. MARIE-REINE JEAN, n. 9 janvier 1766, L'islet.

iv. PIERRE-FRANÇOIS JEAN, n. 15 février 1767, L'islet; m. MARGUERITE-URSULE LECLERC, 19 juillet 1790, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

v. MARIE-FRANÇOISE JEAN, n. 16 juin 1768, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

vi. MARIE-ROSE JEAN, n. 24 septembre 1769, Saint-Jean Port Joli; m. JOSEPH LECLERC, 5 juillet 1790, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

vii. MARIE JEAN, n. 19 novembre 1770, Saint-Jean Port Joli; d. 22 novembre 1770, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

viii. MICHEL JEAN, n. 27 septembre 1771, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

ix. JULIEN-BAPTISTE JEAN, n. 7 mars 1775, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

x. VÉRONIQUE JEAN, n. 15 avril 1776, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

xi. JOSEPH-MARIE JEAN, n. 21 janvier 1778, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

xii. MARIE-ÉLISABETH JEAN, n. 14 juillet 1779, Saint-Jean Port Joli; m. MICHEL MORNEAU, 5 novembre 1799, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

xiii. ARCHANGE JEAN, m. ALEXIS GAGNÉ, 8 février 1825, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.





Génération 5



5. AUGUSTIN6 JEAN (PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le 27 septembre 1771 à Saint-Jean Port Joli. Il épousa MARIE-LOUISE CARON le 27 septembre 1796 à Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, fille de PIERRE-LAURENT CARON et LOUISE-ÉLISABETH CHOUINARD.



Les enfants d?AUGUSTIN JEAN et MARIE-LOUISE CARON sont:

6. i. JEAN-BAPTISTE7 JEAN, n. vers 1799.

ii. AUGUSTIN JEAN, n. vers 1797; m. GENEVIÈVE LABBÉ, 10 octobre 1820, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

iii. MARIE-LOUISE JEAN, n. vers 1801; m. JOSEPH COLLIN, 13 juin 1826, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

iv. LOUIS JEAN, n. vers 1802; m. ESTHER DAGNEAU, 23 octobre 1827, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.





Génération 6



6. JEAN-BAPTISTE7 JEAN (AUGUSTIN6, PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né vers 1799. Il épousa FRANÇOISE ROBICHAUD le19 octobre 1824 à Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, fille de JOSEPH ROBICHAUD et JOSEPHTE JEAN.



Les enfants de JEAN-BAPTISTE JEAN et FRANÇOISE ROBICHAUD sont:

7. i. JEAN-BAPTISTE8 JEAN, n. vers 1825.

ii. FRANÇOISE JEAN, n. vers 1827; m. LOUIS VAILLANCOURT, 2 février 1847, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

iii. SALOMÉE JEAN, n. vers 1828; m. ALEXANDRE BOURGAULT, 26 novembre 1850, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

iv. CYPRIEN JEAN, n. vers 1830; m. PHILOMÈNE MOREAU, 19 octobre 1864, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.

v. JOSEPH JEAN, n. vers 1832; m. JOSÉPHINE CÔTÉ, 13 février 1865, L'islet-sur-Mer.

vi. MARGUERITE JEAN, n. vers 1835; m. LOUIS DUVAL, 14 février 1871, Saint-Jean-Port-Joli.





Génération 7



7. JEAN-BAPTISTE8 JEAN (JEAN-BAPTISTE7, AUGUSTIN6, PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le vers 1825. Il épousa VÉNÉRANDE CARON 27 juillet 1847 à Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, fille de PIERRE CARON et JOSEPHTE JEAN



Les enfants de JEAN-BAPTISTE JEAN et VÉNÉRANDE CARON sont:

8. i. JOSEPH9 JEAN, n. 6 mai 1858, Saint-Jean Port Joli.

ii. MARIE-VÉNÉRANDE JEAN, m. AMABLE OUELLET, 20 février 1871, Saint-Octave de Métis.

iii. FÉLIX JEAN, m. MARIE DIONNE, 14 septembre 1880, Saint-Octave de Métis.

iv. FRANÇOIS JEAN, m. CAROLINE DIONNE, 9 janvier 1883, Saint-Octave de Métis.

v. ANTOINE JEAN, m. MARCELLINE BOUCHARD, 14 février 1888, Saint-Octave de Métis.





Génération 8



8. JOSEPH9 JEAN (JEAN-BAPTISTE8, JEAN-BAPTISTE7, AUGUSTIN6, PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le 6 mai 1858 à Saint-Jean Port Joli. Il épousa MARIE-LÉA BRIAND le 6 septembre 1881 à Saint-Octave-de-Métis, la Mitis, fille de FRANÇOIS-XAVIER BRIAND et CLAIRE TREMBLAY.



Les enfants de JOSEPH JEAN et MARIE-LÉA BRIAND sont:

9. i. ALPHONSE10 JEAN, n. 3 mai 1888, Saint-Octave de Métis.

ii. MARIE-HILDEGARDE JEAN, n. 21 juillet 1885, Saint-Octave de Métis; m. JOSEPH PLOURDE, 15 septembre 1908, Saint-Octave de Métis.





Génération 9



9. ALPHONSE10 JEAN (JOSEPH9, JEAN-BAPTISTE8, JEAN-BAPTISTE7, AUGUSTIN6, PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le 3 mai 1888 à Saint-Octave de Métis. Il épousa CÉLANIRE DURETTE-ROCHEFORT le 23 juillet 1912 à Saint-Angèle-de-Mérici, La Mitis, fille de CHARLES DURETTE-ROCHEFORT et MARIE PLANTE.



Les enfants d?ALPHONSE JEAN et CÉLANIRE DURETTE-ROCHEFORT sont:

10. i. JOSEPH-CLÉMENT11 JEAN, n. 6 mars 1925, Paroisse-Saint-Antoine, Padoue.

ii. MARIE-ANGE JEAN, n. vers 1913; m. FLORIAN PARADIS, 8 juillet 1935, Padoue.

iii. YVETTE JEAN, n. vers 1915; m. ANTOINE PARENT, 11 septembre 1939, Padoue.

iv. ARMAND-OSCAR JEAN, n. vers 1916; m. BÉATRICE-YVONNE OUELLET, 11 juin 1941, Padoue.

v. LAURETTE JEAN, n. vers 1917; m. ÉMILIO-CYPRIEN DIONNE, 3 juillet 1943, Padoue.

vi. LOUIS-PHILIPPE JEAN, n. vers 1919; m. ROSE-MARIE ARTON, 27 juin 1944, Padoue.

vii. CÉCILE JEAN, n. vers 1921; m. ROGER BOUCHER, 4 septembre 1954, Mont-Joli.





Génération 10



10. JOSEPH-CLÉMENT11 JEAN (ALPHONSE10, JOSEPH9, JEAN-BAPTISTE8, JEAN-BAPTISTE7, AUGUSTIN6, PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) est né le 6 mars 1925 à Paroisse-Saint-Antoine, Padoue. Il épousa MARIE-APOLLINE HARTON, GAGNON le 20 septembre 1954 à Price, fille de CHARLES HARTON et APOLLINE GAGNON. Elle est née le 9 février 1922 à Saint-Rémi-de-Métis, Price.



Les enfants de JOSEPH-CLÉMENT JEAN et MARIE-APOLLINE HARTON sont:

11. i. COLETTE12 JEAN.

ii. DANIELLE JEAN, m. RAYMOND MAILLETTE, 27 août 1982, Price.

iii. MICHELINE JEAN, m. JEAN-LOUIS VIGNOLA, 17 juin 1983, Sainte-Flavie.



Génération 11



11. COLETTE12 JEAN (JOSEPH-CLÉMENT11, ALPHONSE10, JOSEPH9, JEAN-BAPTISTE8, JEAN-BAPTISTE7, AUGUSTIN6, PIERRE5, PIERRE4, PIERRE3, PIERRE2, VIVIEN1) Elle épousa NELSON CAMPION le 24 février 1978 à Price, fils d?YVON CAMPION et RITA COUTURIER.



Les enfants de COLETTE JEAN et NELSON CAMPION sont:

i. YAN13 CAMPION.

ii. RENÉE CAMPION.

iii. RÉGIS CAMPION. 
Favreau, Francoise (I2413)
 
193 e-link can be found @

http://www.geni.com/people/Pierre-Jean/6000000001245049708?through=6000000006895361069 
Family F919
 
194 E-Link can be found at-approximately 1/3 down from the top:

http://www.familyorigins.com/users/s/t/g/Bob--Stgelais/FAMO1-0001/d782.htm



Information:
Pierre HELIE-BRETON was born after 1758.

Parents: Jean-Baptiste + HELIE-BRETON and Madeleine POULIOT.

He was married to Genevieve VALLEE on 22 Nov 1803 in St. Michel de Bellechasse, P. Q..

Children were: Isidore HELIE-BRETON. 
Family F804
 
195 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F806
 
196 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F784
 
197 E-link can be found at:

http://www.nosorigines.qc.ca/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?pid=995866&lng=en

Children:
Married children of Paquette Gabrielle and/or Thibodeau Georges
Name Born Death Father Mother Husband/Spouse
Georgette Thibodeau Georges Thibodeau

Georgette Thibodeau Campeau Raymond
Campeau Denise Jean-Guy Thibodeau
Savoie Exilda Yvon Thibodeau
Urbain Jocelyne Daniel Thibodeau
France Thibodeau Dahan Garry
Johanne Thibodeau Comeau Pierre  
Thibodeau, Georges (I2005)
 
198 E-link can be found at:

http://www.nosorigines.qc.ca/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?pid=995866&lng=en

Children:
Married children of Paquette Gabrielle and/or Thibodeau Georges
Name Born Death Father Mother Husband/Spouse
Georgette Thibodeau Georges Thibodeau

Georgette Thibodeau Campeau Raymond
Campeau Denise Jean-Guy Thibodeau
Savoie Exilda Yvon Thibodeau
Urbain Jocelyne Daniel Thibodeau
France Thibodeau Dahan Garry
Johanne Thibodeau Comeau Pierre  
Paqeutte, Gabrielle (I2012)
 
199 E-Link can be located at:

http://www.normlev.net/ancestry/d152.htm#P304


12 viii. Cyrille BÉLANGER was born and baptized on 3 April 1839 (*4*) in Ste-Marie de Beauce. He married Victoire FOURNIER on 7 June 1859 in St-Bernard, Dorchester, Québec. He died on 1 June 1918, at the age of 79, in Coventry, Rhode Island. They had eleven children: George, Marie Belzémire, François, Joseph, Marie Délima, Émilie, David, Victoire, Gédéon, Arthémise et Cordelia. (1)(3)(5)
Cyrille and Victoire immigrated to Coventry in 1881. This author's maternal great-grandfather. (NAL)(3) 
Belanger, Cyrille (I2162)
 
200 E-link found at:


http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/h/e/Robert-Lheureux/GENE16-0187.html


6597. Pierre8 Thibodeau (Pierre7, Pierre6, Pierre5, Michel4, Michel3, Pierre2, Mathurin1). 
Family F791
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next»